Art History - Antique maps and prints - Famous Artists and Illustrators - Historical Outline

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THIS IS A REFERENCE PAGE ABOUT FAMOUS ARTISTS AND ILLUSTRATORS THAT FLOURISHED IN THE 19th CENTURY

It is useful as an information resource for the History of Art.

There are links to pages with scanned images of prints by the relevant artist as well as links to Postaprint feature pages dedicated to the more productive or famous artists.

There is also a search facility for most of the artists and illustrators listed which will bring up a current inventory* of prints that we have in stock.
 

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ARTISTS/ILLUSTRATORS

INDEX (Alphabetical by Last Name)

A-D

D-N

P-Z


HENRY THOMAS ALKEN (1785-1851) was an engraver, illustrator and above all a sporting artist. Born in London, England to a family which became famous for its sporting engravers and artists. Supposedly, Henry worked as a trainer for the Duke of Beaufort before he became a pupil of the miniaturist J. T. Barker Beaumont. Alken exhibited the miniatures that were a product of his studies at the Royal Academy in 1801-2.

In 1810 Henry moved to Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England to train horses and supplemented his income by painting hunting scenes on decorative trays. His career didn't really take off until 1813 when he issued prints under the alias 'Ben Tally Ho'. He produced most of his work in the 1820's and 30's, however, his work lost its interesting quality after the 1830's and he died impoverished on the 8th April 1851. Henry's son H. G. Alken extensively imitated his father's work after he had died.

Alken (Senior)'s separate prints and illustrations are very colourful and lively and in a caricaturist style. He enlarged an idea of Gillray's that the hunting mishaps could be visually displayed in the same format as the chase scenes. His publisher, Thomas M'Lean was notably part of 'The Repository of Wit and Humour.' Alken was considered to be the originator of the medium that Caldecott, Leech and Phiz would prosper.

It is possible that Alken's sketchbook and scrapbook, which contained many images of closely related yet separate incidents, could have influenced the strip stories found in Victorian magazines.

His drawings (other than those printed) were most frequently seen in soft pencil with colour washes.

Alken's work can be found in the following:

The Beauties and Defects in the Figure of the Horse comparatively delineated - 1816; National Sports of Great Britain - 1821; Humorous Specimens of Riding - 1821; Symptoms - 1822; Sketchbook - 1823; Sporting Scrapbook - 1824; Shakespeare's Seven Ages - 1824; Flowers from Nature - 1824; A Touch of the Fine Arts - 1824; Humorous Illustrations of Popular Songs - 1826; Don Quixote - 1831; The Life and Death of John Mytton - 1837; Jorrocks Jaunts and Jollities - 1837; The Sporting Review - 1842-6 and The Art and Practise of Etching - 1849. Some of Alken's work has also been published in the Illustrated London News and other newspapers of the day.


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REAR-ADMIRAL WILLIAM ALLEN (1793-1864) was merely an amateur as an artist. He was highly decorated as an officer and took part in the Niger expeditions in 1832 and 1841-2. He was a lieutenant when he produced images for this publication and he ascended through the ranks until he became Rear-Admiral in 1862.

Allen's work can be found in the following:

Fernando Po - 1838; The Shores and Islands of The Mediterranean Drawn From Nature - c.1840; Picturesque Views of the River Niger - 1840 and The Dead Sea - 1855.

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THOMAS ALLOM (1804-1872) was a Topographical Illustrator and Architect. He was born in London, England and in 1819 he was apprenticed to the architect Francis Goodwin. Allom was a founder member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). He produced designs for buildings in London and carried them out himself as well as working with the architect Sir Charles Barry on numerous projects.

He produced many illustrations for publications of the topographical nature in the mid 1800s including: Devonshire and Cornwall Illustrated; The Shores and Islands of The Mediterranean Drawn From Nature. - c.1840 and The Fashionable guide and Directory to the Public Places of Resort Illustrated with Views; The Royal Dictionary-Cyclopædia for Universal Reference... - c.1860; Allom died at the age of 68 in Barnes, London, England.


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JOHN WYKEHAM ARCHER ARWS (1808-1864) was a topographical illustrator and watercolourist. He was born on August 2nd 1808 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England and moved to London 1820 in order to become an apprentice engraver.

He was articled to John Scott (animal engraver) and on completion of his apprenticeship, he moved back to Newcastle and in partnership with William Collard, he worked as an engraver. He later worked in Edinburgh, Scotland and moved back to London in 1831 where he worked for W. and E. Finden.

In time he began to work more and more in watercolour although he still produced wood engravings in the 1840s and continued to produce topographical images for engraving. Archer became Associate to the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours (ARWS) in 1842. He died on 25th May 1864, in London.

Examples of Archer's work can also be found in the following publications: The Castles and Abbeys of England, W. Beattie - 1844; Winkle's Illustrations of the Cathedral Churches - 1836/7; London, Charles Knight - 1841; Payne's Universum - 1847; Illustrated London News - 1847-9 (animals); Household Song - 1861; Vestiges of Old London; Douglas Jerrold's Magazine and William Twopenny's Magazine.

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GEORGE ARNALD ARA (1766-1841) was a topographer and landscape painter. Born in Bedfordshire, England, he showed great talent with drawing from an early age. He studied at Houghton Regis and members of the local gentry encouraged him to become an artist. He became a student of William Perther, who had a talent for moonlight scenes and seascapes, likewise Arnald also developed an aptitude for this kind of imagery.

In 1798 and 1799, Arnald travelled to North Wales with John Varley and was later articled to Sir George Beaumont. In 1810 he was elected Associate to the Royal Academy but failed to obtain full membership. This embittered him somewhat, however, he still continued to work on his landscapes in Europe and Ireland and dabbled in etching occasionally.

Arnald's highest honour was a prize that he won for a painting entitled "The Battle of the Nile", he was also commissioned by the Duke of Gloucester. He died on 21st November 1841 at Pentonville, London, England.

Arnald's work can be found in the following: The Border Antiquities of England and Scotland - 1814-17; The New British Traveller - 1819; Picturesque Scenery on the Meuse - 1835 and History and Topography of Essex - 1836.

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WILLIAM HENRY BARTLETT (1809 - 1854) was a topographical illustrator who was articled to John Britton. He travelled extensively, visiting Syria, Egypt, Palestine and America. He died on this voyage around the world at sea at the tender age of 45 years.

Bartlett's work can be found in the following:

Britton's Cathedral Antiquities - 1832-6; Switzerland - 1833; The History of Essex - 1836; Picturesque Antiquities of English Cities; Scotland Illustrated - 1838; The Waldenses - 1838; Beauties of the Bosphorus - 1839; American Scenery - 1839-40;1842; Ireland Illustrated - c.1841; Canadian Scenery - 1842; Finden's Ports and Harbours - 1842; The Danube - 1844; Walks About Jerusalem - 1845; Forty Days in the Desert - 1848; The Nile-Boat or Glimpses of Egypt - 1849; The Overland Route - 1850; Footsteps of our Lord and his Apostles in Syria, Greece and Italy - 1850; Pictures from Sicily - 1852; The Pilgrim Fathers - 1853 and Scripture Sites and Scenes - 1854.

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THOMAS SHOTTER BOYS (1803-1874) was a lithographer as well as a painter. He was born on January 2nd 1803 at Pentonville. He was apprenticed to G. Cooke at the beginning of his career. He travelled to Paris in 1825, where he stayed and worked for R. P. Bonington the French publishers. This stage of his career was the most important of his life, the influence of this publishing company encouraged him to move from engraving to watercolour and lithography.

Boys saw that watercolour effects could be brought to a larger portion of the public through lithography. His most recognised work in this medium was Picturesque Architecture in Paris, Ghent, Antwerp and Rouen - 1839. He followed this with Original Views of London As It Is - 1842. The latter of which was not as colourful as the former, but was still hand tinted and a few were fully coloured.

Boys' talent was obvious, his use of colour and ability to use it in a sensitive manner particularly. He was able to express light to the highest standards, his interpretation of sunlight on large buildings being the most appealing.

Unfortunately, Boys' talent was not enough to ensure his success as a painter, and the remainder of his life was spent etching and preparing lithographs for various works.

Boys' work can be found in the following:- Picturesque Architecture in Paris, Ghent, Antwerp and Rouen - 1839; Original Views of London As It Is - 1842; History of England; Modern Painters; Stones of Venice and The Royal Dictionary-Cyclopædia for Universal Reference... - c.1860

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JOHN BRITTON FSA (1771 - 1857) was originally a publican by trade. After his apprenticeship he went on to write ballads as well as dealing in hops. It wasn't until 1801 that he showed an interest in topography and began producing books in partnership with Edward Brayley. Their first Publication was entitled 'The Beauties of Wiltshire,' It was the first in a long line of topographical publications. After the seventh volume was produced, Britton seemed to lose interest in the 'beauties' series. However, he was succeeded by J. C. Smith (1778 - 1810), also a topographical draughtsman, and Britton continued to supply illustrations for the guides produced.

Britton was a self-made editor who was blessed with a great talent in the area. He called the artists that he gathered together 'scientific artists'. He later went on to produce an enormous biography which was completed and released 7 years before he died, at the age of 86.

Britton's work can be found in the following:

Architectural Antiquities of Great Britain - 1804-14; Cathedral Antiquities of England - 1814-35; Specimens of Gothic Architecture - 1823-5; The Architectural Antiquities of Normandy - 1825; Dictionary of Architecture and Archaeology of the Middle Ages - 1829; Public Buildings of London - 1825-8; Devonshire and Cornwall Illustrated - 1832; History...of...the...Palace...of Westminster - 1834-6; Architectural Description of Windsor - 1842.

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GEORGE BRYANT CAMPION (1796-1870) was a topographical artist, painter and lithographer. His specialty was militaria. He was elected a member of the New Watercolour Society in 1834. He was the a drawing master at the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich for some time. He died in Munich, where he emigrated to, in April 1870.

Campion's work can be found in the following:- The Adventures of a Chamois Hunter and Virtue's View in Kent - 1830

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George Cattermole (1800-1868) was an illustrator of romance and a watercolourist. Born at Dickleburgh, Norfolk, England, he was the youngest brother of the Reverend Richard Cattermole. He first worked as an architectural Draughtsman, painting historical buildings. Britton's English Cathedrals, 1832-1836 contained much of his work. It was around this time that George's work gradually changed, emphasising on figures and depicting historical events rather than old structures. His style moved towards the swash-bucklers of the 17th century, his works depicted duels and sieges taking place in backgrounds that were enthralling and accurate showing a strong ability in the use of watercolours. 

Some of the works that George contributed to Sir Walter Scott's Poetical and Prose Works of Sir W. Scott and Landscape Illustrations of the Works of Sir W. Scott, 1833 showed a wonderful sense of history and his portrayal of the costumes was precise although they were constructed in a fervent manner with impulsive pen lines. Some of the works from these publications were later re-drawn as watercolours.

As a result of Cattermole's talent and achievement he became enormously successful. He was a close friend of Dickens who refered to him as 'Kittenmoles' had George illustrate some of his work from Master Humphrey's Clock, 1841. Through his connection with Dickens and other distinguished gentlemen, George joined the Kensington Gore set and became a Member of the Garrick Club. 

Queen Victoria was one of Cattermole's frequent patrons, so much so that he was offered a knighthood - that he refused. Later in life he attempted, unsuccessfully, to branch out into oil painting. As this medium is far removed from the practice of watercolour it would have been very difficult to achieve the same standard and therefore he would have been unable to establish himself as an oil painter.

In 1822, Cattermole was elected an Associate of the Old Watercolour Society and after an interval, he was elected a full member in 1833. He died in 1868 in London.

Cattermole's work can be found in the following:

Barnaby Rudge and The Old Curiosity Shop in Dickens' Master Humphrey's Clock - 1841; Poetical and Prose Works of Sir W. Scott; Britton's English Cathedrals - 1832-1836; Roscoe's North Wales - 1836; Cattermole's Historical Annual: The Great Civil War - 1841-45; Cattermole's Portfolio - 1845 and Heath's Gallery - 1836-8.

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JOSEPH CLAYTON CLARKE (1856/7-1937) worked under the pseudonym of Kyd. He had many occupations during his career, including designing cigarette cards, postcards, illustrating and he was also a Fore-edge painter after 1912. He specialised in painting Dickens' characters. He worked for Punch magazine for one day and as a free-lance artist until 1900.

Joseph Clarke was apparently a profligate and eccentric man. A trait common amongst artists. He died on August 8th 1937 at Hampstead.

Kyd's work can be found in the following: The Characters of Charles Dickens - 1889; Some Well Known Characters from the Works of Dickens - 1892; Fleet Street Magazine - 1887; Fun - 1890-92; The Star.

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DAVID COX (1783-1859) was a landscape painter and water colourist. He began his career with the Birmingham Theatre as a scene painter. Cox was born in Birmingham, England, and moved to London in 1803 where he became an extremely influential practitioner and drawing-master. He travelled abroad in 1826 to study colour and later became a precursor of Impressionism.

Cox's work can be found in the following: Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolour - 1814; Progressive Lessons on Landscape for Young Beginners - 1816; A Series of Progressive Lessons - c.1816; The Young Artist's Companion - 1825; A Treatise on the Aeropleustic Art of Navigation in the Air by means of Kites - 1851 and The Fashionable guide and Directory to the Public Places of Resort Illustrated with Views - c.1835.

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THOMAS CRESWICK (1811-1869) was an illustrator and landscape painter. He was born in Sheffield, England in 1811 and studied with J. V. Barber at Birmingham before moving to London in 1828. His forte was the English summer landscape and he frequently worked with animal and figure painters to complete his images. He was one of the early members of the Goldsmith 'Etching Club' and Ruskin commended him for one of his illustrations from the Book of English Ballads.

He was elected Associate to the Royal Academy in 1842 and a full member in 1851. He died eighteen years later, in the latter part of 1869, being buried at Kensal Green.

Creswicks work can be found in the following:- Walton's Compleat Angler; Works of Goldsmith; Deserted Village - 1841; Gray's Elegy - 1847; L'Allegro - 1849; Songs and Ballads of Shakespeare - 1853; Moxon's Tennyson - 1857; Favourite English Poems of the Last Two Centuries - 1858-9; Early English Poems - 1863 and The Churchman's Family Magazine - 1863.

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George Cruikshank (1792-1878) was a polemicist on temperance, etcher, artist and caricaturist. He was born in Bloomsbury, England on September 27th 1792. George worked with his father (also a caricaturist) from a young age, engraving chapbooks and lottery tickets, his first published design being in 1806. Following his father's death in 1810, George progressed to become a political caricaturist, the leader of the regency in his field, overtaking Gillray, both physically and spiritually, at the establishment of Mrs. Humphrey. 

When the caricature boom was at its peak in about 1820, Cruikshank's work appeared in short lived journals such as The Wits' Magazine, consequently he began to establish himself as a book illustrator. 'Life in London' (a regency best-seller) was Cruikshank's first major work in book illustration, he then went on to illustrate other works including 'Life in Paris' and other smaller books which developed into a means for his own energetic drawings. Through the 1830s Cruikshank was a leading illustrator and he became involved in works by Sir Walter Scott, Harrison Ainsworth and Charles Dickens. Simultaneously, he issued yearly almanacks under his own name, which ran from 1835-1853 at which time he began to release 'George Cruikshank's Magazine,' from 1853-1854. 

Towards the end of the 1840s, Cruikshank became teetotal which gave him a new appetite for life. This could not have been timed better as his fame was beginning to waver. As a result Cruikshank worked with new vigour, his pen rarely stopping for the next thirty years. The majority of this work was for the Temperance League and included his epic work that took him 3 years to finish, 'The Worship of Bacchus.' Unfortunately due to the enormous size of this piece, which consisted of many tiny figures in groups in a variety of stages of indulgence, it has no place in our art world and is now kept in the cellars of the Tate Gallery. Although this work is extremely imaginative, and shows a sharp view of the pathetic and ridiculous, he was considered to have a low level of genius as his work was reflective of the 18th century and not the 19th despite Ruskin's praise on his children's illustrations. 

On February 1st, 1878, Cruikshank died at Mornington Crescent, London, England. He was originally buried at Kensal Green, but it was later moved to St. Paul's Cathedral, this was prompted by the temperance lobby and not because of his significance as an artist. 

It is rare to find a finished drawing by Cruikshank. They are usually found as small scale pencil studies for his final pieces, the foremost figures being drawn over in ink.

George Cruikshank's work can be found in the following: Nelson's Funeral Car - 1806; Life in London - 1820; Life in Paris - 1822; Peter Sclemihl - 1824; Greewich Hospital - 1826; Phrenological Illustrations - 1826; Illustrations of Time - 1827; Punch and Judy, Scraps and Sketches - 1828; Three Courses and a Dessert - 1830; Hogarth Mortalized, Roscoe's Mortalists Library - 1831; Salis Populi Suprema Lex - 1832; Sundays in London - 1833; Cruikshankiana - 1835; My Sketchbook, Comic Almanack - 1835; Sketches by Boz (Dickens) - 1836; Waverley Novels - 1836-1838; Oliver Twist (Dickens); Jack Sheppard; Guy Fawkes - 1838; The Tower of London - 1840; George Cruikshank's Omnibus - 1841; The Bachelor's Own Book, Arthur O'Leary - 1844; George Cruikshank's Table Book, Maxwell's Irish Rebellion - 1845; Outline of Society - 1846; The Bottle - 1847; The Drunkard's Children - 1848; The Adventures of Mr. and Mrs. Sandboys - 1851; Uncle Tom's Cabin - 1852; George Cruikshank's Fairy Library - 1853-1854; The New Political House That Jack Built - 1854; Life of Falstaff - 1857; A Pop Gun Fired Off - 1860; The British Bee Hive - 1867; Our Gutter Children - 1868; The Brownies and Other Tales - 1871; The Trial of Sir Jasper - 1873; Peeps of Life - 1875; The Rose and The Lily - 1877; Bentley's Miscellany - 1837-1843; Ainsworth's Magazine - 1842; Cassell's Illustrated Family Paper - 1853; British Workman - 1855; Ingoldsby Legends - 1864; Cassell's Illustrated Family Readings - 1867; Belgravia - 1868; The Illustrated Times - 1877; The Illustrated London News - 1877.

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THOMAS COLEMAN DIBDIN (1810-1893) was an illustrator and painter. Born in Bletchworth, Surrey on October 22nd 1810. His father was the dramatist, Thomas Dibdin. His working life began in the General Post Office as a clerk, at seventeen years old. Eleven years later, at the age of 28, he left that employment to take up painting professionally. Dibdin travelled widely throughout Europe, including, France, Germany and Belgium. Whilst there he drew the old towns and attractive buildings. Later, Dibdin invented the process of Chromo-lithography. He died in Sydenham on December 26th 1893.

Dibdin's work can be found in the following:- Progressive Lessons in Water Colour Painting - 1848; Herman's Works - 1839; Bacon's Oriental Annual and Rock Cut Temples of India - 1845.

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PAUL GUSTAVE LOUIS CHRISTOPHE DORÉ (1832-1883) was an extremely hardworking 19th century artist. He not only illustrated books but he painted and sculpted also. His talent became manifest at an early age, his first dated drawings having been produced at the age of five years.

Doré took up lithography at the age of 11 years and by the time that he was 12 he was already carving his own stones and making up stories for them. He is responsible for many famous works (listed below).

Gustave became well known both in England and France. The former was due to the work that he contributed to the Illustrated London News and in France his reputation was made when he wrote and illustrated 'Rabelais'.

Doré's success in England made it possible for him to open his own art gallery. His ambition was to be recognised as a great painter.

His early work was more linear than his later tonal images. He tended to portray dramatic scenes with flair rather than accuracy.

It is difficult to express the true genius of Doré's work in this small space. If you click on the link below, we have a page which outlines his life in much more detail written by Dan Malan, author of: 'Gustave Doré - Adrift on dreams of Splendor'

Doré's work can be found in the following: Philippon's Journal Pour Rire - 1848; Rebelais - 1854; The Wandering Jew - 1856; Jaufry the Knight and the Fair Brunissende - 1856; The Adventures of St. George - 1858; Boldheart the Warrior - 1858; The History of Don Quixote - 1863; The Ancient Mariner - 1865; Days of Chivalry - 1866; The Adventures of Baron Munchausen - 1866; Fables of La Fontaine - 1867; Elaine Guinevere, Viven, Enid and Idylls of the King (by Tennyson) - 1867-68; The Bible - 1867; Popular Fairy Tales - 1871; Poems of Thomas Hood - 1872; London: A Pilgrimage - 1872; Illustrated London News - 1853, 1855-6 and 1858, The Illustrated Times - 1855-60; Cassell's Illustrated Family Paper - 1857.

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WALTER HOOD FITCH (1817-1892) is the illustrator responsible for most of the prints in A History of the Vegetable Kingdom by William Rhind - c.1865. He was born on January 29th 1817 and was a botanical illustrator who submitted a large body of work for use in Sir. W. J. Hooker's works on plants.

The majority of which were made after 1835. Fitch had a great talent at depicting plants in a way that emphasised their beauty. Hooker once said of Fitch: "He couldn't make a mistake if he tried," showing the great talent that he possessed.

Fitch's work can be found in the following:

Ixones Plantarum - 1827-54; Illustrations of the Nueva Quinologia of Pavon - 1859; A History of the Vegetable Kingdom by William Rhind - c.1865; The Forest Flora of N. W. and Central India - 1874 and The Botannical Magazine - 1827-65.

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MYLES BIRKET FOSTER - Known as Birket Foster - (1825-1899) was an illustrator and pastoral painter. Born to a Quaker family on February 4th 1825, Foster was said to have been capable of drawing sooner than he could speak. His family moved to London when he was still at school. At the age of 16, Foster was articled to an engraver called Stone. After the unfortunate suicide of his master, he was apprenticed to Ebenezer Landells who himself had been a student of Thomas Bewick (who had been an acquaintance of Foster's grandfather.)

In 1846, Foster began his own career in book illustration, working for Vizetelly. He was very productive in this period and in 1859, due to his success, he dropped this line of work. His work became known to the public via the vignettes he produced for Longfellow's "Evangeline" in 1850, and since then he had many commisions to illustrate books of modern poetry and other classics.

For two years, from 1841-1843, Foster produced initial letters for Punch Magazine, but his work for magazines was resticted compared with his work on books. His refined, delicate work was more suited to the illustration of books. Much of his work was on a small scale and very detailed. His landscapes depicted attractive vegetation, herds of animals and people.

Although capable of engraving, he very rarely did so, he tended to draw directly onto the woodblocks, which were then engraved by others.

As well as illustrating, Foster designed the covers of books. He was one of the very first artists to have his work reconstructed by colour block in the Illustrated London News - 1857. Foster travelled abroad with Fred Walker, whose figures complimented Foster's landscapes. He was also friendly with the Pre-Raphaelites.

Although Foster's watercolours were emotional and romantic, he has attracted collectors in large numbers. He was elected Associate to the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1860, and a full member in 1862. He died at Weybridge, Surrey on March 27th 1899.

Foster's work can be found in the following:-

Burns Poems and Songs - 1846; Longfellow's Evangeline - 1854; Gray's Elegy - 1853; Longfellow's Poems - 1854; Proverbial Philosophy - 1854; Cowper's The Task - 1855; Adam's Sacred Allegories - 1856; Herbert's Poetical Works - 1856; Rhymes and Roundelays - 1856; Ministering Children - 1856; The Ancient Mariner - 1856; Bloomfield's Farmer's Boy - 1857; Course of Time - 1857; Gertrude of Wyoming - 1857; Choice Series - 1857-64; Poe's Poetical Works - 1858; Lays of the Holy Land - 1858; Home Affections - 1858; Favourite English Poems - 1859; Odes and Sonnets - 1859; The Seasons - 1859; Montgomery's Poems - 1860; The Book of South Wales - 1861; Household Song - 1861; Merrie Days of England; Early English Poems - 1863; Poetry of the Elizabethan Age; Christmas with the Poets; Legends and Lyrics - 1866; Moore's Irish Melodies - 1867; Beauties of Landscape - 1873; The Trail of Sir Jasper; Pictures of English Landscape - 1881; Picturesque Mediterranean - 1891; Punch - 1841-3; Illustrated London News - 1853 and The Illustrated Times - c.1855.

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HENRY G. GASTINEAU (1791-1876) was a topographer and landscape artist. He trained as an engraver and then studied at the Royal Academy Schools, after which he travelled extensively in Great Britain painting the scenery as he went. He was elected Associate to the Old Watercolour Society (AOWS) in 1821 and became a full member (OWS) in 1823. From 1827, Gastineau worked in Camberwell as a drawing master, where he died on January 17th 1876.

The prints in this work are extensive, they cover a wide range of views in Wales and meet a high standard. The picturesque scenery within Wales is conveyed well as are the many castles, churches and other buildings of interest. The people in various parts of the country are expressed within their surroundings showing their way of life, therefore, their culture.

Gastineau's work can be found in the following:

The Surrey Tourist (or Excursions through Surrey) - 1821; Excursions in the County of Kent - 1822; Wales Illustrated - 1829

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JOHN GREIG (fl. 1807-1824) was a draughtsman, lithographer, engraver and landscape painter. In this work he not only contributed drawings but also engraved the majority of the plates. He worked with J. S. Storer in supplying antiquarian engravings and publishing The Antiquarian Cabinet.

Greig's work can be found in the following: Promenades Across London - 1817; The New British Traveller - 1819; Excursions in the County of Kent - 1822; Views of London; Tours in Cornwall - 1824; Britton's Beauties of England and Wales - 1801-15 and Border Antiquities of England and Wales - 1817.

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JAMES DUFFIELD HARDING (1797-1863) Born in Deptford (London, England) Harding was a topographer, teacher, lithographer and watercolourist. He studied with the engraver Charles Pye and Samuel Prout.

Harding preferred drawing to engraving and worked as a landscape artist from an early age, exhibiting at the Royal Academy from 1810. He worked for Hullmandel producing lithographic folios from the works of Stanfield, Roberts and Bonington. In the 1820s, 30s and 40s he travelled extensively in Europe and produced books of his travels as well as copy-books for amateur artists.

His drawing master John Ruskin regarded Hardings talent in high esteem. Much of Harding's watercolours and pencil sketches which were prepared for his books occur frequently on the market.

Harding's work can be found in the following:

The Tourist in Italy - 1831; Lithographic Drawing Book - 1832; Art, or the Use of The Lead Pencil - 1834; The Waldenses or Protestant Valleys of Piedmont, Dauphiny and the Ban de la Roche - 1838; Principals and Practices of Art - 1845; Lessons on Trees - 1852; Scotland Delineated - 1858; Views in Spain - 1824; Britton's Cathedrals - 1832-6; Sketches at home and abroad - 1836; Finden's Ports and Harbours - 1842; and The Book of South Wales - 1861.

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JOHN HAWKESWORTH worked in London in around 1820.

Hawkesworth's work can be found in the following:

The Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet - 1812; Excursions in the County of Kent - 1822 and The History and Antiquities of Islington - 1823.

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CHARLES HEATH (1785 - 1848). All of the plates in 'Paris and its Environs' were engraved under supervision of Mr. Heath. He was mainly known for publishing 'Annuals' in the 1830's. He worked extensively producing plates for popular works in the early 19th century.

Heath's work can be found in the following:

Paris and its Environs Displayed in a Series of Picturesque Views - 1828-30.

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THOMAS HIGHAM (1796-1844) was an engraver and topographer. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1824 to 1830.

Higham's work can be found in the following:

The Antiquarian Itinerary - 1817 and Excursions in the County of Kent - 1822.

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RICHARD PRINCIPAL LEITCH (fl.1840-1875) was an illustrator and drawing master. He wrote instructional books as well as painting landscapes. In 1859, he was sent to Italy as a journalistic artist to cover the Franco-Italian War for the Illustrated London News. His brother was William Leighton Leitch.

Richard Leitch's work can be found in the following:

Illustrated London News - 1847-61; Poets of the Nineteenth Century - 1857; Good Words - 1864; The Sunday Magazine - 1865; Idyllic Pictures - 1867; Belgravia - 1868; and The Quiver.

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WILLIAM LEIGHTON LEITCH (1804-1883) was born in Glasgow, Scotland in November 1804. He was primarily a landscape painter, his brother Richard Principal Leitch was an illustrator and drawing master as well. They both submitted work for the Illustrated London News Richard being sent to Italy in 1859 in order to cover the Franco-Italian War and their father was a manufacturer.

After attending the Highland Society School, William was articled to a lawyer. Later, with D. Macnee, he studied art. He became a sign painter and then in 1824 he was a scene painter at Glasgow's Theatre Royal. William moved to London in order to work at the Pavillion Theatre.

In 1833, he went to Italy, not to return until five years later. He spent his time travelling extensively, teaching and, all the while he was sketching. When he returned to England, William became a fashionable watercolourist and teacher in London and was also encouraged by Queen Victoria. He died in 1883 on April 25th aged 78.

Leitch's work can be found in the following:

The Shores and Islands of The Mediterranean Drawn From Nature. - c.1840 and the Illustrated London News

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Daniel Maclise, R.A was an illustrator and a portrait/historical painter. He was born in Cork, Ireland. His father was a former Scottish Soldier. He attended the Cork Art School and, whilst studying there, he was brought to public attention with a sketch of Sir Walter Scott. He was eighteen at the time.

In 1827, Maclise moved to London, England, and studied at the Royal Academy schools. His talent was so great that he won gold and silver medals only 1 year later. Daniel was to remain in London then, and After a brief trip to Ireland in late 1829, he moved back to London to embark on a career as an illustrator.

Eighty of Maclise's caricatures were contributed to Fraser's Magazine on his return, over a period of six years. Mordant literary sketches accompanied the images and were written by William Maginn. The caricatures themselves were executed using a lithographic pen, a tool that suited Maclise's intricate style well.

Since the publication of Fraser's Magazine, Maclise's work was recognized and, in the 1840s, he illustrated many books of legend. He focused his work on the illustration of fantasy, a subject that he preferred, although he was more than competent at realistic imagery. His main sources being in German illustration.

A quiet and shy man, he became very popular as a painter, being elected Associate to the Royal Academy in 1835 and becoming a full member in 1840. He was offered the presidency of the Royal Academy and a knighthood in 1866, both of which he declined. He died in Chelsea on April 25th 1870.

Maclise's work can be found in the following publications: Fairy Legends - 1826; Tour Round Ireland - 1826; Fraser's Magazine - 1830-36; The Keepsake - 1835; Heath's Gallery - 1836 and 1838; The Old Curiosity Shop - [Dickens] 1841; Ireland, It's Scenery and Character - 1841; The Chimes: A Goblin Story - [Dickens] 1844; The Cricket on The Hearth, A Fairy Tale - [Dickens] 1845; Thomas Moore's Irish Melodies - 1845; Leonara - 1847; Moxon's Tennyson - 1857 and 1861; The Princess - [Tennyson] 1860; Idylls of the King - [Tennyson] 1866; Story of the Norman Conquest - 1866.

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HORATIO McCULLOCH RSA (1805-1867) was a landscape painter. A weaver's son, he was born in Glasgow, Scotland on November 9th 1805, he studied art with Daniel McNee and William Leighton Leitch.

His first venture was as a snuff box painter with McNee, he then moved to Edinburgh, Scotland and took up engraving. He specialised in scenery of the Highlands and was a great influence on the next generation of painters Scottish painters.

McCulloch first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1829. He was elected Associate of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1834 and was made a full member in 1838. He died on June 24th 1867 in Edinburgh.

McCulloch's work can be found in the following:

Scotland Illustrated - c.1838.

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FREDERICK NASH OWS (1782-1856) was a lithographer, architectural illustrator, painter and watercolourist. Born in Lambeth, London, England, he became proficient in drawing under the instruction of T. Malton, Jnr and later studied at the Royal Academy schools. In 1800 he hosted his first exhibition at the Royal Academy. Nash began his working life as an architectural draughtsman, and was periodically employed by Sir R. Smirke RA. He contributed abundantly to many publications, which gained him great success. His feel for the utmost in accuracy earned him, in 1807, the position of Artist for the Society of Antiquaries. This post lead to commendation from Turner and employment by Ackermann.

In 1811, Nash was elected a member of the Old Watercolour Society (OWS) and in 1816 he began touring Europe on sketching trips, visiting Germany, France and Switzerland. From 1827 to 1841 he made similar tours around Great Britain some of which he was accompanied by Peter de Wint. Nash's work changed in his later years becoming more moody, his illustrations had practically stopped illustrating and focused on views of Brighton and Windsor, the former of which was where he resided and died in 1856.

Nash's work can be found in the following: The Collegiate Chapel of St. George at Windsor - 1805; Twelve views of the Antiquities of London - 1805-10; The New British Traveller - 1819; Picturesque views of the city of Paris and its Environs - 1819-23; Howlett's Views in the County of Lincoln - 1802; Britton's Beauties of England and Wales - 1801-15; Ackermann's Oxford - 1814 and the Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet - 1809.

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GEORGE PETRIE PRHA (1789-1866) was a topographer and landscape painter. Born in Dublin, his Father was a miniature painter, with whom he studied as well as attending the RDS schools. He then focused solely on landscapes. He travelled throughout Ireland and Wales with the artists: J. A. O'Connor and F. Danby in the early 19th century.

In 1826, he was elected Associate to the Royal Hibernian Academy and then a full member in 1828. He then became the Librarian in 1829 and the President in 1856, a position that he held until aged 70 years. As well as producing images, he also wrote articles for the Dublin Penny Journal - 1822-23 and was Editor of the Irish Penny Journal in 1842.

His watercolours were not considered to be as attractive as his ink drawings, the former being composed more formally. He died in Dublin aged 76/7.

Petrie's work can also be found in the following publications: Ancient Music of Ireland - 1855; Excursions Through Ireland - 1819; New Picture of Dublin - 1821; Historical Guide to Ancient and Modern Dublin - 1821; Beauties of Ireland - 1825-6 and published after his death: Ireland Illustrated - 1881.

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"Phiz" aka Hablot Knight Browne (1815-1882) was a book illustrator, humorous artist and watercolourist. Kennington was his place of birth and he was educated in Suffolk. His apprenticeship was with Finden, the engraver, and after completing this he opened up his own studio whilst he attended the St. Martin's Lane School. 

He first began to illustrate Dickens' work in 1836, unfortunately it was due to his predecessor, Robert Seymour's death. He also produced the illustrations for Sunday as it is, another of Dickens' works, that same year. He continued to illustrate Dickens' major novels until he was replaced by new, modern illustrators, in the 1860's.

In 1857, Browne's work had moved on somewhat the same year that Little Dorrit appeared. Dickens, however, found him to be a worthy companion and he brought Browne with him on two trips in order for Browne to collect reference material for his new naturalistic work.

In 1867, Browne became paralysed, In 1880, he moved to Brighton, where he died two years later. His studio was sold on December 5th 1887, by Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge.

Hablot Knight Browne had much of his work published, as can be seen in the list of works shown below, many of which Phiz was the sole illustrator and others that he merely contributed to.

His work can be found in the following: Sunday under Three Heads - Dickens, 1836; Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club - Dickens, 1836-1837; Sketches of Young Ladies by 'Quiz' - 1837; Sketches in London - 1838; A Paper of Tobacco - 1839; Nicholas Nickleby - Dickens, 1839; Harry Lorrequer - 1839; Master Humphrey's Clock: Old Curiosity Shop and Barnaby Rudge - Dickens, 1840-1841; Legendary Tales of the Highlands - 1841; Peter Priggins - 1841; Rambling Recollections - 1842; Jack Hinton - 1842-1843; Spendthrift, Mervyn Clitheroe - 1857-1858; Irish Peasantry - 1843-1844; Martin Chuzzlewit - Dickens, 1844; Tom Burke - 1844; St. Patrick's Eve - 1845; Tales of the Train -  1845; Nuts and Nutcrackers - 1845; The O'Donohue - 1845; Fanny the Little Milliner - 1846; The Commisionner - 1846; Teetotalism - 1846; Puck on Pegasus - 1861; Dombey and Son - Dickens, 1846-1848; The Knight of Gwynne - 1847; The Fortunes of Colonel Torlogh O'Brien - 1847; Charles O'Malley - 1841; Irish Diamonds - 1847; Old St. Paul's - 1847; Pottleton Legacy - 1849; David Copperfield - Dickens, 1849-1850; Roland Cashel - 1849-1850; Sketches of Cantabs - 1850; Fiddle-Faddle's Sentimental Tour - 1845; The Great Gun - 1844;  The Illustrated Byron - 1850; The Daltons - 1850-1852; Ghost Stories - 1851; Tale of Two Cities - Dickens, 1859; Lewis Arundel - 1852; Bleak House - Dickens, 1852-1853; Letters Left at the Pastrycooks - 1853; Crichton; Phiz's Funny Alphabet - 1883; Christmas Day - 1854; The Water Lily - 1854; The Dodd Family Abroad - 1854; Harry Coverdale's Courtship - 1854; Home Pictures - 1856; Little Dorrit - Dickens, 1855-1857; Davenport Dunn - 1859; The Minister's Wooing - 1859; Ovingdean Grange - 1860; Twigs for Nests - 1860; One of Them - 1860; Martins of Cro' Martin - 1856; Barrington - 1862-1863; Tom Moody's Tales - 1864; Facey Romford's Hounds - 1864; Luttrell of Arran - 1865; Ballads and Songs of Brittany - 1865; Can You Forgive Her? - 1866; Dame Perkins and Her Mare - 186; New Sporting Magazine - 1839; London Magazine - 1840; Punch - 1842-1844 then 1861-1869; New Monthly Magazine; Illustrated London News - 1844-1861; Ainsworth's Magazine - 1844; The Illuminated Magazine - 1845; Judy; The Union Magazine - 1846; Life - 1850; Illustrated London Magazine - 1853-1855; The Illustrated Times - 1855-1856; Only a Week; Tinsley's Magazine; London Society; St. James' Magazine; Illustrated Gazette; Sporting Times; The Welcome Guest.

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JOSEPH POWELL PNWS (1780-1834) was a topographer, landscape painter and drawing master. His speciality was views of Wales, the lakes of England and the South Coast of England. Powell was the first President of the New Watercolour Society (NWS) in 1832. He also made lithographs and etchings as well as drawings.

Powell's work can be found in the Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet - 1809 and The New British Traveller - 1819.

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JOHN 'SKINNER' PROUT NWS (1806-1876) was an architectural illustrator and painter. Born in Plymouth and nephew of Samuel Prout (Topographical illustrator, drawing master and watercolourist).

John specialised in similar subjects to his uncle but was practically self-taught. He was elected a member of the New Watercolour Society (NWS) on his return from Australia in 1849, where he visited Sydney and Hobart.

He had already forfeited his membership of the NWS in 1838 by being overseas. John settled in Bristol after 1849 where he became a good friend of W. J. Muller (artist). He later moved to London where he died, at Camden Town on 29th August 1876.

Skinner Prout's work can be found in the following:

Sydney Illustrated - 1842-4; Antiquities of Bristol and Australia Illustrated - 1875.

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SAMUEL PROUT (1783-1852) was a drawing master, topographical illustrator and watercolourist. He was born on 17th December in Norfolk, England and studied under the master of the Plymouth Grammar School, J. Bidlake. He was not always able to produce work to the high standards required by publishers such as John Britton. In 1796 Britton employed Prout to tour Cornwall in order to sketch views for his series of Beauties of England & Wales after having seen the sketches of Devonshire that Prout produced whilst touring with the historical painter, B. R. Haydon. These sketches of Cornwall were unsuccessful and it wasn't until 1802 that his work had improved to a satisfactory standard and he was re-employed by Britton.

Prout's work was considered to be exceptional, he depicted Gothic architecture with great precision. He was also able to show the mood of the buildings contrasted with highlights of figures which, for a generation, was widely copied. This was mainly due to Ruskin's report on him in Modern Painters, which described Prout as a substantial and sunny colourist.

Prout was ill continually, however, he finished work on Wiltshire, Essex and Cambridgeshire for John Britton. It wasn't until 1819, after he became a member of the Old Watercolour Society (OWS), that Prout first travelled to the Continent visiting France. He then went on to travel widely in Europe visiting Bavaria, Italy, The Rhine and Belgium in 1824. His last tour was to Normandy in 1846 after which, he became extremely ill and was unable to work from that time until his death in February 1852.

Prout's work can be found in the following:

Beauties of England and Wales - 1803-14; Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet - 1809; Rudiments of Landscape in Progressive Studies - 1813; Rudiments - 1814; The New British Traveller - 1819; New Drawing Book - 1819; Series of Easy Lessons in Landscape Drawing - 1819; Views of Cottages - 1819; Excursions in the County of Kent - 1822; Illustrations of the Rhine - 1824; The Tourist in Italy - 1831; Jenning's Landscape Annual - 1831; The Continental Annual - 1832; Facsimiles of Sketches made in Flanders and Germany - 1833; Hints - 1834; Sketches in France, Switzerland and Italy - 1839; The Shores and Islands of The Mediterranean Drawn From Nature. - c.1840; Microcosm - 1841; Sketches at Home and Abroad - 1844 and Rhymes and Roundelayes - 1850.

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WILLIAM PURSER (1790-1852) was primarily an architect. However, like many architects at the time (e.g. Thomas Allom) he was also a topographical draughtsman. He began to study at the Royal Academy in London in 1807 and travelled in Greece and Italy with John Sanders where he undertook some momentous archaeological work.

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THOMAS HOSMER SHEPHERD (c.1817-c.1842) was a topographical illustrator who was extremely talented and was able to produce works of outstanding beauty and skill. Frederick Crace employed him to illustrate views of London in c.1829. He also draughted views of Edinburgh, Bath and Bristol which were published in the mid-nineteenth century.

Shepherd's work can be found in the following:

Excursions in the County of Kent - 1822; Metropolitan Improvements - 1827; London and it's Environs in the Nineteenth Century - 1829; Modern Athens Displayed (or Edinburgh in the Nineteenth Century) - 1829; Bath and Bristol - 1829-30 and London Interiors - 1841.

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FREDERICK WILTON LITCHFIELD STOCKDALE (fl. 1803-1848) was primarily a topographer. He worked as assistant to the secretary of the East India Company until, due to ill health, he was compelled to resign. However, despite this, he contributed prolifically to topographical works. Stockdale also exhibited in the Royal Academy

Stockdale's work can also be found in the following: Etchings...of Antiquities in...Kent - 1810; A Concise...Sketch of Hastings, Winchelsea and Rye - 1817; The Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet - 1812; Excursions in Cornwall - 1824; The Cornish Tourist - 1834; The Beauties of England and Wales - 1801-13; Antiquarian Itinerary - 1818 and Ackerman's Repository - 1825-28.

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JAMES SARGANT STORER (1771-1853) was an engraver, draughtsman and topographer. Born in Cambridge, England and he was based there. His principal work consisted of illustrative studies of the Cathedrals and medieval buildings of England. He worked with his son on many works (the Messrs Storer), Their artistic ability was not of the same standard as those that were patronised by Ackermann, however, the small scale drawings of buildings that they produced were accurate. James Storer died in London, England in 1853.

Storer's work can be found in the following:

The New British Traveller - 1819; Cathedrals of Great Britain - 1823-4; Illustrations of Cambridge - 1827-32; Britton's Cathedrals - 1832-6; The Cambridge Almanac - 1832; Cantabrigia Illustrata - 1835; Collegiorum portae apud Cantabrigium - 1837; Delineations of the Fountains Abbey; Delineation of the Chapel of Kings College; Delineations of Trinity College.

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J M W TURNER RA (1775-1851) was born in London, England on April 23rd 1775.

It was in 1806 that W F Wells suggested that Turner's work could reach a much wider public, were they to be engraved and published in book form. Turner etched some of the plates himself and the rest he conscientiously supervised every stage of their production, it was even said that he trained an entire school of engravers. This process ensured that the engravings of Turner's work were indeed as effective and desirable as his paintings.

The Turner Gallery was published in 1875, after his death and includes 120 fine steel engraved plates, covering a range of his works. From views and landscapes in Great Britain, Germany and Italy, to studies of ships, mythical scenes and scenes from classical Rome.

Turner's work can be found in the following:

The Copper Plate Magazine; The Pocket Magazine - c.1798; Cooke's Picturesque Views of the Southern Coast of England - 1814-26; Views in Sussex - 1816-20; The Rivers of Devon - 1815-23; Hakewell's Picturesque Tour of Italy - 1818-20; Whitaker's History of Richmondshire - 1818-23; Provincial Antiquities of Scotland - 1819-26; The New British Traveller - 1819; Picturesque Views of England and Wales - 1827-38; Roger's Poems - 1834; Byron's Life and Works - 1832-34; Rivers of France - 1833-5; Scott's Poetical and Prose Works - 1834-7 and The Turner Gallery - 1875.

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LOUIS WILLIAM WAIN (1860-1939) was an animal illustrator and caricaturist. Born in London, England on 5th August 1860, his mother was French and his father was English. Until 1879, Louis studied Music. From 1877 he studied at the West London School of Art where he became the assistant master (1881-2).

He worked for the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News from 1882 and then for the Illustrated London News in 1886.

Wain was the first to draw cats in humorous human situations, this he began in 1883 and was to become his fame. Before he became well known however, he also drew dogs, and poultry including some amusing sketches of Owls, again, in humorous situations.

Wain's popularity spread to the United States and encouraged him to take a trip to New York, where he worked for the New York America for a while. Later he published annuals, illustrated postcards, joined many committees related to felines and became president of the National Cat Club (England).

Unfortunately, Wain later became insane and he died impoverished on 4th July 1939.

Wain's work can be found in the following:

The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News - 1882; Illustrated London News - 1883-99; The English Illustrated Magazine - 1884-1900; Moonshine - 1893; The Sketch; The Gentlewoman; Pall Mall Budget; The Boy's Own Paper; Judy - 1898; The Windsor Magazine; Lloyds Weekly News - 1905; Louis Wain's Annuals - 1901-23; New York America; Louis Wain's Summer Book - 1906-7; The Kitcats; 9 China Futurist Cats - 1922 and Louis Wain Big Midget Book - 1926-7.

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RICHARD CATON WOODVILLE (1856-1927) was a prolific artist of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He primarily worked as a journalistic illustrator for the Illustrated London News.

His battle scenes being extremely accurate, were his forte. He travelled widely portraying the action of many wars but he also travelled in America drawing a wide variety of subjects there.

Woodville not only illustrated but also painted. His large canvases being accurate and grotesquely beautiful to behold.

Woodville's work can be found in the following: Ravenstones - 1894; Illustrated London News - 1876-1911; The Cornhill Magazine - 1883; The Sketch; The Boy's own Paper; The Windsor Magazine; The English Illustrated Magazine - 1895-97; Pearson's Magazine - 1896.

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