Antique maps and prints of historic Alabama.

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This short REFERENCE PAGE is designed to provide no more than a 'glimpse' of the history of ALABAMA,
with a couple examples of antiquarian maps and engravings of the State and some interesting Links.

This Page is provided as a REFERENCE RESOURCE - it is NOT an Inventory.

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After very many years in the Trade, I am now retired and the Postaprint Website as such is no longer available.
However this large collection of Reference Pages is being left on line, as we hope you will find them to informative and helpful. They provide details of many of the maps, books and engravings we had the pleasure of dealing in over so many years.
For a complete  index of all such Reference Pages PLEASE DO CLICK
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However, my wife has a store on eBay, with many offers of delightful antiquarian maps & prints & engravings.

We only offer genuine original antiquarian maps and historical engravings, printed at the dates stated.
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STATE OF ALABAMA

The article below was written in 1885 and makes interesting reading.

Topography: Alabama is 330 miles in length, and, on the average, 154 miles in breadth; and has an area of 52,250 square miles, or 33,440,000 acres.

In the northeast, the country is rugged and uneven, and the southern extremity of the Alleghany mountains extends thence west, forming the dividing line between the head waters of the Tennessee and the rivers which flow south to the Gulf of Mexico.

The slope from this to the south is gradual, with rolling prairies in the centre of the State, and the extreme southern portion is flat, and but slightly elevated above the sea level.

There is about sixty miles of sea coast, including Mobile Bay, the finest harbor on the gulf. The Mobile river is formed by the junction -of the Alabama and Tombigbee; and the Chattahoochee, Coosa and Tennessee all have a part of their course in Alabama.

Climate: Although Alabama lies within seven degrees of the tropics, its climate is not unpleasant, the mean annual temperature being about 63 Fahrenheit.

In the northern and more elevated sections the temperature is moderated by the sea breezes, and seldom exceeds 95, except in July, when the thermometer has been known to record 104. In the winter months the range is from 20 to 80, and in spring from 25 to 90 Fahrenheit.

Snow very seldom falls, and ice is almost unknown. The rainfall varies from forty-six to forty-nine inches per annum.

History: Alabama was visited by De Soto in 1541, and in the beginning of the eighteenth century Mobile was founded by the French. In 1763 the entire French possessions east of the Mississippi, which included a portion of Alabama, were ceded to England by the treaty of Paris, but in 1783 that portion south of latitude 31 was retroceded to Spain.

Alabama formed a part of Georgia until 1798, when that State became a member of the Union, and the country now included in the States of Mississippi and Alabama became the Territory of Mississippi. That portion of the gulf coast extending from Pearl river to Perdido Bay, then occupied by the Spaniards and forming part of Florida, was seized during the war of 1812.

The British had taken possession of Mobile and Pensacola to facilitate their military operations in the South, but were driven out without much difficulty by Gen. Jackson and his Tennesseeans. In 1813 the Creeks, instigated by the British, massacred a number of Americans at Fort Mims.

The Tennessee militia, under the command of Gen. Jackson, marched to the aid of their countrymen, defeated the Indians at the hard-fought battles of Talladega and Emuckfaw, and finally destroyed the power of the Creeks in the desperate fight at the Horseshoe Bend.

The State of Mississippi was formed from the western portion of the Territory in 1817, and the eastern haIf constituted the Territory of Alabama until Dec. 14, 1819, when it was admitted into the Union, having then a population of 120,000. Being a cotton-growing State and entering the Union with a large slave population, which increased with much greater rapidity than the white race, Alabama naturally held very strong views in favor of the "peculiar institution," and when the long-pending struggle reached a crisis it was one of the very first to propose extreme measures. Its representatives withdrew from the Charleston convention in April, 1860, because that body refused to adopt a strong pro-slavery platform.

In November following, Alabama sent commissioners to the other Southern States urging their withdrawal from the Union, and the formation of a Confederacy. The ordinance of secession was adopted in convention Jan. 11, 1861, and on February 4 the Confederacy was organized at Montgomery.

The State next seized the forts at Mobile, and other United States property, and prepared for war. State troops were raised and sent North in 1861, but no conflict occurred within the State until the following year.

In February, 1862, the Union gunboats entered the Tennessee river and reached the Muscle Shoals, and in April following, Gen. Mitchell, with a division of Gen. Buell's army, took Huntsville and Russellville, and for several months held the northern part of the State.

Admiral Farragut bombarded the forts at Mobile in August, 1864, and early in 1865 an expedition under Maj. Gen. Wilson captured Chickasaw, Selma and Montgomery. On April 12 Mobile fell into the hands of Gen. Canby and Rear-Admiral Thatcher, who had led a combined military and naval force from New Orleans, and the final surrender of all the forces, munitions of war and ships was made in May following.

Reconstruction measures were commenced in April, 1865, and in 1867 Alabama became a part of the third military district. In February, 1868, a new constitution was adopted; the fourteenth amendment was ratified in June, and on July 14 the State was readmitted. The fifteenth amendment was ratified in 1870, and the constitution now in force was adopted in 1875.

Population: Census of 1880: Males, 622,629; Females, 639,876; Native, 1,252,771; Foreign, 9,734; White, 662,185; Colored, 600,320, including 4 Chinese and 213 Indians and Half-breeds.


ANTIQUARIAN MAP OF ALABAMA

Published by ARMSTRONG 1891.

historical map of alabama by armstrong. 1891.


INTERESTING LINKS

OTHER POSTAPRINT US STATES FEATURE PAGES

Tuscaloosa web

Alabama News

Information Services in the State of Alabama

Contributions and suggestions for additional links would be most welcome.

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SOME GIFT IDEAS FROM JULIE
DO VISIT MY EBAY SHOP FOR GIFT IDEAS

 Perhaps a map or print of somewhere important in someone's life. For example, where they were born, got married, went on honeymoon etc. I do have a wide selection of topographical views and historical maps. America's, UK, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, The World, Etc.
...Or do a search for their last name, you will be surprised what you might discover!

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