Antiqua Print Gallery The Panter-Harding-Goldwyer expedition
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The Panter-Harding-Goldwyer expedition


Frederick Kennedy Panter

Frederick Kennedy Panter (1836–13 November 1864) was a policeman, pastoralist and explorer in colonial Western Australia. While exploring in the Kimberley region of Western Australia in 1864, he was murdered by Australian Aborigines.
Born in 1836, Frederick Panter was a relative of Governor of Western Australia Sir Arthur Kennedy. Little is known of his early life, except that he was a police constable in Queensland, came to Western Australia, and by 1861 was Perth's Inspector of Police.

William Goldwyer

William Goldwyer (August 1829–13 November 1864) was a police officer and explorer in colonial Western Australia. While exploring in the Kimberley region of Western Australia in 1864, he was killed by Australian Aborigines.
Born in England in August 1829, William Goldwyer emigrated to Western Australia and was appointed a night warder to the Convict Establishment in March 1853. From 1855 to 1857 he was a mounted constable at Dandaragan, and later became Sergeant of Police there. Fluent in Aboriginal languages and renowned for his bushcraft, he often undertook the dangerous task of carrying the monthly mail from Perth to Champion Bay. In November 1859 Goldwyer married Marie Antonia Kellam. At the time of his marriage he was described as a master mariner.

James Harding

James Harding (1838 – 13 November 1864) was a pastoralist and explorer in colonial Western Australia. While exploring in the Kimberley region of Western Australia in 1864, he was murdered by Australian Aborigines.
Born in England in 1838, James Harding emigrated to Western Australia with his family on the Dromo in 1846. He went to England again in 1848 but returned to Western Australia in 1850. In 1859 he was farming at York with Charles Wittenoom.
In April 1861, Harding volunteered to join an exploring expedition to the Pilbara region of Western Australia, under Francis Gregory. The five month long expedition discovered large amounts of poor pastoral land around the De Grey River.
In 1864, Panter was selected to lead an expedition to Camden Harbour to test the story of a convict, Henry Wildman, who claimed to have found gold there many years earlier. On arrival in the area, Wildman became sullen and uncooperative, and tried to escape. No gold was found, but large areas of good pastoral land were discovered around Roebuck Bay. Consequently, a public company, the Roebuck Bay Company, was formed to establish a chain of stations in the area, and Panter joined the advance party that sailed to the area to set up a base camp. The following month, Panter, along with James Harding and William Goldwyer set out from the base camp on an expedition to explore the area around La Grange Bay. The Panter-Harding-Goldwyer expedition did not return, and eventually a search party under Maitland Brown was sent to find them. Brown's La Grange expedition party eventually found the three men dead, having been clubbed and speared to death by natives. Panter and Harding were apparently killed in their sleep. Goldwyer's death was harder to interpret; some sources claim that all three men were killed in their sleep, while others assert that Goldwyer was keeping watch. The date of death of the men was determined from the date of the last entries in the men's journals.
The bodies of Panter, Harding and Goldwyer were returned to Perth, where thousands of spectators attended their public funeral. In February 1913, a monument to Brown and the three murdered men, the Explorers' Monument, was unveiled in Fremantle.
At the time of Panter's death, he was engaged to marry Georgiana, daughter of John and Georgiana Molloy.

(Source Wikipedia)